Girl in the Tutu

Book By: Carl L. Williams
Book By: Eddie Cope
Play #: 8282
Pages: 54 pgs
Cast: 6 m, 6 w

Here's a fast-moving, fun-filled play that mixes melodramatics with show business. Sonny Nuggett, a young, handsome theatre student (the hero, of course!) tries to assemble a dance act to save his parents' failing restaurant in the Gold Country of Old Californy. Col. Questus Quantrell, a shady showman with hypnotic powers, appears with three clumsy dancing girls. He schemes to take over the café by plotting murder and cheating two old prospectors, Pa and his old partner, Fred, out of their newly re-found "lost" goldmine. Fred is the father of Cora, a beautiful and talented ballet dancer (our lovely heroine!) who gets caught up in the mayhem. The play features a wacky cast, plenty of action, and side-splitting humor.

Product tags
Sample Now
Perusal Only
Delivery Method
All orders with downloads must be paid by credit card
Single Copy for Perusal Only - $6.95
Purusal copies are limited to one per customer.
Buy Now
Delivery Method
All orders with downloads must be paid by credit card
Production Script - $6.95 each
Must order at least one per performer.
Performances - $60.00
Performance Fees are required even if you do not charge admission.
Performance beginning date

Productions

COMMUNITY THEATRE OF LINDEN 1 Performance(s)
STOCKTON, CA 2/14/2015
PHILLIPS COUNTY PLAYERS 3 Performance(s)
HOLYOKE, CO 11/2/2013
THACKERVILLE SCHOOLS 1 Performance(s)
THACKERVILLE, OK 12/17/2010
PLATTE COMMUNITY THEATER 2 Performance(s)
PLATTE, SD 7/7/2007
NEW ULM COMMUNITY CENTER 3 Performance(s)
NEW ULM, MN 10/21/2006
THEATRE SUBURBIA INC 16 Performance(s)
HOUSTON, TX 6/21/2006
BACKDOOR THEATER 8 Performance(s)
WICHITA FALLS, TX 8/19/2005
J DANIELS MIDDLE SCHOOL 1 Performance(s)
RALEIGH, NC 4/14/2005
BINGER ONEY HS 1 Performance(s)
BINGER, OK 11/12/2004

Behind The Scenes

PLAYWRIGHTS CARL L. WILLIAMS AND EDDIE COPE

TALK ABOUT "THE GIRL IN THE TUTU"

 

Q: WHAT INSPIRED YOU TO WRITE THIS MELODRAMA?

 

Williams: Eddie conceived the basic plot and characters, then asked me to co-write the play with him.

 

Q: WHAT'S YOUR FAVORITE PART OR LINE IN THE PLAY? WHY?

 

Williams: My favorite part is whenever the triplets are onstage because they add a lot of fun and energy to the play.

 

Q: WHEN DID YOU START WRITING?

 

Cope: 1975.

Williams: I started writing short stories in college, long ago. A few were published. Next, I tried my hand at novels. One of them, "Hanging Justice," is being published soon by John M. Hardy Publishing Company.

 

Q: HOW DID YOU GET STARTED AS A PLAYWRIGHT?

 

Cope: I wrote a blackout skit for a revue.

Williams: In 1994, I joined a playwriting group called Scriptwriters/Houston and won their annual ten-minute play contest. Eventually, I advanced to one-act and full-length plays, several of which have won competitions and have been produced.

 

Q: WHAT DO YOU LIKE MOST ABOUT WRITING PLAYS?

 

Williams: Since I write comedies, what I like most about writing plays is hearing the laughter of the audience when the plays are performed.

 

Q: WHAT IS THE MOST CHALLENGING PART OF THE WRITING PROCESS?

 

Cope: Characterization.

Williams: Besides finding the time to write, the most challenging part is devising a plot that will maintain interest throughout the play, along with characters that engage the audience.

 

Q: WHAT ARE THE MOST IMPORTANT THINGS TO CONSIDER WHEN WRITING A PLAY?

 

Cope: Conflict.

Williams: The playwright also has to consider his intended audience and whether his story, characters, and writing are strong enough to please that audience.

 

Q: WHERE DO YOUR CHARACTERS COME FROM? ARE THEY BASED ON PEOPLE YOU KNOW?

 

Williams: Most of the characters in my plays are simply invented.

 

Q: WHAT DO YOU TRY TO ACHIEVE WITH YOUR PLAYS?

 

Cope: Producability.

Williams: My goal is to entertain the audience, and as many audiences as possible.

 

Q: WHAT ARE YOUR HOBBIES? WHAT DO YOU DO IN YOUR SPARE TIME?

 

Cope: Seeing plays, reading plays, and taking cruises.

Williams: Besides running to keep in reasonable shape, I use my spare time to attend plays or readings, and of course to write, or at least to think about writing.