Dwayne Lee Yancey

Dwayne Yancey can still remember all the lines from his debut performance on stage - both of them. In eighth grade. Many decades later, he is a journalist by profession but a playwright by avocation. By day (and sometimes by night), he is a senior editor at The Roanoke Times in Roanoke, Va. On the side, he writes plays. Many of his scripts reflect his interest in Shakespeare and bringing Shakespeare to the masses, even if that does mean a few, um, script changes for a modern audience. Yancey comes from a theatre family. His wife acts and directs in community theatre and both his children are stage veterans. They live in Fincastle, Va.
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  Hit the Books

Comedy by Dwayne Lee Yancey

24 pages

1 m, 4 w


Molly, a college student studying for exams, becomes so frustrated she hits herself in the head with her art history textbook. Suddenly, she thinks she’s the Mona Lisa. Her roommate, Abby, becomes frantic. A suitemate, Zoë, arrives who thinks the logical thing to do is to hit Abby on the head with another book. Soon, Brittany, an airhead, and Jeremy, Molly’s boyfriend, are on the scene. Throughout, every time someone gets hit in the head with a book, they instantly acquire command of the subject matter: from art history to the laws of physics, from phone book...

  Macbeth Goes Hollywood

Comedy by Dwayne Lee Yancey

61 pages

4 m, 4 w, 5-19 flexible, extras


Shakespeare's agent options his script "Macbeth" to a Hollywood producer who wants a "few" changes to make the play more contemporary. The trouble is the producer isn't sure what changes exactly should be made. Soon Shakespeare is casting the poor witches alternately as country singers, rappers, and punk rockers, while Macbeth and Lady Macbeth perform their lines as gangsters, farmers and Goths. A member of the audience is even pulled onstage at one point to help Macbeth rehearse a murder scene. If that's not bad enough, the final showdown between Macbeth and...

  Code 40: Verona

Drama by Dwayne Lee Yancey

44 pages

6 m, 2 w, 14 flexible


This play begins at the ending of Shakespeare's "Romeo and Juliet" but envisions a modern twist - it's a police drama, in which incompetence and political pressure rule the day. Balthasar and Friar Lawrence still flee the bloody scene in the Capulet family tomb and are apprehended by church security guards. But this time, security calls the police, who proceed to investigate the crime. The police release the friar because they can't imagine how he would be involved and instead try to pin the crime on Balthasar. The mayor, Escalus, is under political pressure ...

  Copyright Violation, The

i-Scene by Dwayne Lee Yancey

5 pages

By Dwayne Yancey


Alicia's new cartoon tattoo, done on a somewhat private place on her body, violates Mega Studio's copyright. All the studio requires is that she display the tattoo whenever they specify! Characters include Alicia, the attorney, and the "repo" man. Aghhh!

  Day The Church Picnic.

i-Scene by Dwayne Lee Yancey

7 pages

By Dwayne Yancey


A young lawyer has come to try to spring his/her client from the county jail. The client is a prim and proper older woman who has been charged with assault, malicious wounding, destruction of property, and even resisting arrest! And all at the church picnic!

  Day The Circus Tigers.

i-Scene by Dwayne Lee Yancey

2 pages

By Dwayne Yancey


Two tigers are in their cages backstage at the circus. The ANGRY TIGER is pacing nervously back and forth; the LAZY TIGER is taking things easy. The Angry Tiger is frustrated how he will have to jump through a hoop and balance on a ball. The Lazy Tiger reminds him he'll at least get a treat. The Angry Tiger decides it's time to get his own "treat."

  Efficiency Expert, The

i-Scene by Dwayne Lee Yancey

6 pages

By Dwayne Yancey


E-mail means better communication: it's more efficient than long-winded meetings, less effort than formal business letters, and much faster than laying telephone tag. But not always! This poor office worker finds tips from an e-mail efficiency expert really equals more errors!

  Fairweather Friends

Comedy by Dwayne Lee Yancey

56 pages

4 m, 3 w


Lord Liverpool, a chauvinistic proprietor of a 19th century London newspaper, must deal not only with a wife who’s a suffragette and a daughter who seeks own career, but an old school rival out to embarrass him. The plot concerns a series of dispatches being penned by an adventurer in Africa, which have made the Herald a popular newspaper. Unbeknownst to Lord Liverpool, however, the dispatches are actually being written by his wife Athena, who seeks a literary career. Their daughter Calliope, suspecting something is amiss, goes to work for the rival newspaper...

  Father, I Cannot Tell A Lie

i-Scene by Dwayne Lee Yancey

3 pages

By Dwayne Yancey


The question, "Who chopped down the cherry tree," is answered by George Washington as well as several other former presidents and even a few well-known entertainers of today!

  First Impressions Can Be...

i-Scene by Dwayne Lee Yancey

3 pages

By Dwayne Yancey


A SPACE ALIEN with green skin has landed near a beach on earth. Now he or she radios to the mother ship to report his or her findings that these primitive people lather themselves with some kind of cooking oil, then proceed to bake themselves alive!

  Four-Leaf Clover, The

i-Scene by Dwayne Lee Yancey

3 pages

by Dwayne Yancey


A young couple is sitting on a blanket having a picnic. The woman spots a four-leaf clover. She's excited. He is not.

  Game Day Decisions

i-Scene by Dwayne Lee Yancey

6 pages

By Dwayne Yancey


Stan and Tony are rooting for the Jets while John, who's just arrived, starts rooting for the Steelers. When they ask him why, he says he never roots for "Northern" teams. As the guys question him further, John reveals his complicated method of determining which team to support. It seems totally illogical until Trisha enters and starts rabidly rooting for one of the teams for her own reasons.