Walsh And Noll

Playwright, editor and journalist EDWARD J. WALSH (far left) has had an award-winning career as a writer. At various local and national publications, he has served as a general assignment reporter, business reporter, travel writer, columnist and editor. For radio, he has written and helped produce programming for National Public Radio. Walsh also has contributed to or edited several books, including a 150th anniversary edition for Cleveland Cliffs, Inc. In addition, as a playwright his work has been produced Off-Off Broadway, and in many community and college theaters in the Greater Cleveland area. “Harry and Mary,” originally staged and televised on NBC in Cleveland, became the basis for “Two Can Play,” which was produced at the Barter Theatre in Virginia, and again in Kansas City, featuring Hayley Mills. Walsh is a graduate of John Carroll University, where he earned his bachelor’s degree and did post-graduate work in English literature. ROBERT THOMAS NOLL has written 30 produced plays. His works have been performed throughout the U.S., Canada and Europe, including six Off-Off Broadway productions. Eight are published. As a TV producer/writer, he has won nine Emmys and a Silver Medal from the International Film and TV Festival of New York. For NBC, he served as producer/writer for their multi-award-winning syndicated children’s TV series, “Hickory Hideout.” He teaches playwriting and other courses at John Carroll University’s Tim Russert Department of Communication and Theatre Arts in Cleveland, Ohio. (They also produced four of his plays there.) At John Carroll, he also serves as adviser to their award-winning newspaper, The Carroll News. For nearly 20 years, he taught playwriting at The Cleveland Play House. Robert has degrees from Kent State University and Ohio University. He is a member of the Dramatists Guild.
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  Nightmare of Frankenstein

Drama by Walsh And Noll

34 pages

2 m, 2 w, 4 flexible


The House of Frankenstein is in turmoil. Victor Frankenstein, engaged to a woman he deeply loves, has fallen into a fit of despair. The cause of Victor’s behavior is, in fact, a Creature he brought to life. Contrary to what Victor intended, however, his Creature is hideous to look upon. So much so, that the Creature has covered his face so he won’t have to see his own reflection. Desperate, the forlorn Creature strikes a bargain with Victor: If the young scientist will create a suitable bride for him, the Creature will retire with her to the cold and distant ...